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CAFIA Control Activities

01/22/2015
 
According to Council Regulation (EC) No. 510/2006 on the Protection of Geographical Indications and Designations of Origin for Agricultural Products and Foodstuffs, the protected geographical indication (PGI) "Czech beer" was registered. When checking products which are designated as "Czech beer", the checks will especially focus on the specifications for this product, i.e. the raw materials used, method of production and the final product, the method of control during production, the product documentation and its labelling. The PGI Czech Beer may only be used for groups of beers listed in the specification.
A manufacturer who wishes to use the PGI Czech Beer for their products, does not have to register anywhere before marketing the product, but shall request the relevant CAFIA Inspectorate to verify compliance with the specifications. The cost of verifying compliance with the specifications under Article 11, Paragraph 1 of Council Regulation No. 510/2006 on the Protection of Geographical Indications and Designations of Origin for Agricultural Products and Foodstuffs will be borne by the food business.
The boundaries of the region in which Czech Beer may be produced are defined in the specification.
Raw materials:
The traceability of all raw materials must be ensured.
1. Grain bill in the batch
The grain bill in the batch consist of malts and starchy and sugary ingredients The weights and laboratory-measured extractivity of the individual raw materials are recorded on the brewing batch sheet. The total weight of the extract in the batch consists of at least 80% of extract derived from malts that have been produced from approved varieties (i.e. passed a national registration in the Czech Republic for cultivation and are recommended for the production of Czech beer). A list of approved varieties for malt production for the production of Czech Beer can be found here. The varieties must meet the parameters listed in the specifications for Czech Beer.
Examples of the grain bill in the batch are given in Tables 1 and 2.
Table 1: Example of the grain bill in the batch - the conditions for the production of Czech Beer are fulfilled.
Grain bill
(Raw Material)
Weight
(kg)
Extract in origin
(%)
supplied
Extract
(kg)
supplied
Extract
(%)
light malt
4,000
77.8
3,112
86.2
crystalised sugar
500
99.8
499
13.8
total
 
 
3,611
100.0
The weight of extract originating from malt, as a proportion of the total weight of extract included, is higher than 80%, and the condition for production of Czech beer is fulfilled.
Table 2: Example of the grain bill in the batch - the conditions for the production of Czech Beer are not fulfilled.
Grain Bill
(Raw Material)
Weight
(kg)
Extract in origin
(%)
supplied
Extract
(kg)
supplied
Extract
(%)
light malt
3,600
77.8
2,800.8
78.4
barley meal
400
67.6
270.4
7.6
crystalised sugar
500
99.8
499.0
14.0
total
 
 
3,570.2
100.0
The weight of extract originating from malt, as a proportion of the total weight of extract included, is less than 80%, and the condition for production of Czech beer is not fulfilled.
2. Hopping
The hopping in a batch consists of hops and products made from hops. The weight and laboratory determined findings for the α-bitter acid content of hops and products produced from them, must be stated on the brewing batch sheet. The total weight of delivered α-bitter acids used in a batch of light lager must include at least 30% (15% for other beers) of α-bitter acids derived from Czech hops. Authorised hop varieties from the Žatecko, Úštěcko, or Tršicko regions are used. Czech hop varieties recommended by the Research Institute of Malting and Brewing:  Žatecký poloraný červeňák, Sládek, Premiant.
Examples of hopping in the batch are given in Tables 3 and 4.
Table 3: Example of hopping in light lager - the conditions for the production of Czech Beer are fulfilled.
Hopping
(hops,
hop product)
Weight
(kg)
α-bitter acid
in origin
(%)
supplied
α-bitter acid
(kg)
supplied
α-bitter acid
(%)
hop extract
 1
 100
 1
 38.4
bitter hops
N. B. *)
 7
 9.6
 0.672
 25.8
mild aromatic hops
ŽPČ **)
 30
 3.1
 0.93
 35.8
 total
 2.602
 100.0
 *) Northern Brewer    **) žatecký poloraný červeňák
The weight of α-bitter acids derived from Czech hops (Sládek), as a proportion of the total weight of included α-bitter acids, is more than 30%, and the conditions for the production of Czech Beer are fulfilled.
Table 4: Example of hopping in light lager - the conditions for the production of Czech Beer are not fulfilled.
Hopping
(hops,
hop product)
Weight
(kg)
α-bitter acid
in origin
(%)
supplied
α-bitter acid
(kg)
supplied
α-bitter acid
(%)
hop extract
 1
 100
 1
 38.9
bitter hops
Target
 9
 11.2
 1.008
 39.3
aromatic hops - Sládek 
 10
 5.6
 0.56
 21.8
 total
 
 2.568
 100.0

The weight of α-bitter acids derived from Czech hops (Sládek), as a proportion of the total weight of included α-bitter acids, is less than 30%, and the conditions for the production of Czech Beer are not fulfilled.
3. Water
– from local sources, with a hardness according to the specifications
4. Yeast
– brewing yeast for bottom fermented beer
Production:
A food business operator must comply with the traditional method of brewing according to the specification - i.e. one to three mashing processes by decoction (the infusion mashing method MAY NOT be used), lautering, wort boiling. After completion of the boiling, the wort will be cooled to the fermentation temperature and aeration and yeast are added. Fermentation must take place in two stages - the fermentation stages must be separated in the standard way. After the second stage of fermentation is completed, the beer is filtered and bottled. Unfiltered beer may also be produced. The final product must meet the parameters stated in the specifications for Czech Beer.
Production Control:
Compliance with the specification is the responsibility of the food business operator, whose internal "manual" must include a procedure for ensuring compliance with the specifications for Czech beer, incl. the method of production control, control of the finished beer and the frequency of controls. The methods that may be used for production control are stated in the specifications.
Control of documentation:
When checking the specifications, documents relating to the production of Czech Beer will also be reviewed .
1.      origin of raw materials - e.g. delivery notes,
2.      quality parameters of raw materials - e.g. from the supplier of raw materials, laboratory analyses,
3.      inspection of the manufacturing process:
  1. batch sheet – e.g. composition of grain bill and hopping, temperature and duration of mashing, record of wort),
  2. fermentation protocol – e.g. record of yeast used, temperatures during fermentation,
4.      record of control processes during beer brewing, including the final product
  1. recorded in  internal manuals,
  2. records of controls carried out during production of beer,
  3. laboratory analyses of the product,
  4. accordance of the final product with the specifications.
Labelling:
The symbol or designation "Protected Geographical Indication" is printed near the inscription "Czech Beer" and is on the main (front or back) label of the consumer package. Symbols or the equivalent marking must conform to the symbols and labelling according to Regulation (EC) No.1898/2006 as amended, which states the detailed rules for implementing Council Regulation (EC) No 510/2006 on the Protection of Geographical Indications and Designations of Origin for Agricultural Products and Food. Symbols and names may be replaced by equivalent terms in another official Community language. Translations of the registered name "České pivo" (e.g. "Czech Beer") may not be used alone, but always in conjunction with the registered name "České pivo".
The specifications for the PGI "České pivo", do not seek to avoid references to the production of the beer in the Czech Republic. In the case of beers which do not meet the specifications for "Czech Beer", these marks must not be included on the main label or on the packaging and advertising materials, because Article 13 of Council Regulation (EC) No. 510/2006 protects registered products against any direct or indirect commercial use of a registered name for products which are not covered by the registration, in cases where the products are comparable to the registered products. References to beer production mean such phrases as manufactured with Czech technology, made ​​in the Czech Republic, etc.
If an inspector detects the unauthorised use of the name Czech Beer on packaging materials, promotional items, etc., the inspector will inform the competent regulatory body - for example, the Trade Licensing Office in the case of misleading advertising.
 
 
 

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